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Flasher/Zuckerberg vibes today

Flasher/Zuckerberg vibes today

tierradentro:

“Attempting the Impossible”, 1928, René Magritte.

Surrealists were best when they just fucking hated women.

tierradentro:

Attempting the Impossible”, 1928, René Magritte.

Surrealists were best when they just fucking hated women.

Baudrillard says it’s ok to feel overwhelmed sometimes. You’re not an elitist hipster dick for not understanding Beyonce or already getting sick of Birks; you’re simply an exhausted subject.

Baudrillard says it’s ok to feel overwhelmed sometimes. You’re not an elitist hipster dick for not understanding Beyonce or already getting sick of Birks; you’re simply an exhausted subject.

Screw social niceties!
My mind is telling me no (via social conditioning) but my body, my body is telling me yes~
shuitsang:

21414; yyph/raf/ro/yyph/ma+/annd/cd/bbs

shuitsang:

21414; yyph/raf/ro/yyph/ma+/annd/cd/bbs

(via gunnjinnzake)

My week has been weird; has mostly revolved around cursing ‘self-righteous cunt!’ at actually self-righteous high schoolers and old hags but also being self-conscious about whether or not I am a major dick to my sweet cutie pie friends. In a sense, it totally reflects my life in general: allowing social niceties to get in the way of reaching full sour bitch zenith.


"towards anti-neutral clothing" ph. sanna helena berger for tank.

"towards anti-neutral clothing" ph. sanna helena berger for tank.

(Source: opaqueglitter)

aqqindex:

Scott Bromley, Apartment

aqqindex:

Scott Bromley, Apartment

(via endthymes)

Old m8 bob

Old m8 bob

yphtgrphy:

Yau Ma Tei, Hong Kong, 03/13

Also, because I’m getting nostalgic about Asia again.

yphtgrphy:

Yau Ma Tei, Hong Kong, 03/13

Also, because I’m getting nostalgic about Asia again.

yphtgrphy:

Tiong Bahru, Singapore, 02/14

So I started another photo blog. It’s mostly photos from various Asia trips in the last couple of years but y’know. They can’t sit in untitled folders collecting virtual dust forever.

yphtgrphy:

Tiong Bahru, Singapore, 02/14

So I started another photo blog. It’s mostly photos from various Asia trips in the last couple of years but y’know. They can’t sit in untitled folders collecting virtual dust forever.

antipodeans:

tonecones:

yes.

When Robin Boyd’s book was first published in 1960, his critique of Australia’s architectural landscape was denounced as “absolutely unpatriotic for his withering criticism of Australian aesthetics” (Phillip Adams, Late Night Live). At the time, Boyd argued for a shake up of the way in which Australians think about, teach and consume design. His book became a best seller which opened up new conversations about design.
Listen to this great Late Night Live (LNL) coverage of the 50th anniversary of Boyd’s book (from 2010).  The guests reflect on the cultural impact of Boyd’s work, drilling into Boyd’s argument about Australia’s “aesthetic calamity.” Boyd was moved to write the book because, as he saw it, Australians did not realise how bad our design was at the time (its “atrocious prettiness”).
As the Australian suburban sprawl continues to expand, the podcast guests argue that Boyd’s vivacious writing still resonates. The guests on Late Night Live argue that some critics missed Boyd’s point, which was not derision of suburbia per se. Rather Boyd sought to improve the visual landscape. This includes not just artistic vision, but also making better use of space (“medium density”). Boyd focused on “anti-featurism,” a concept focusing on necessity and “lean” design, rather than excess and superfluous detail. 
The Australian Bureau of Statistics recently reported that Australia’s population is set to double by 2050 to 46 million people. Much of this growth will occur in suburbian Melbourne and Sydney, which will each house 8.5 million people. This population expansion will require architectural ingenuity both in terms of design, maximising space, and sustainability.

antipodeans:

tonecones:

yes.

When Robin Boyd’s book was first published in 1960, his critique of Australia’s architectural landscape was denounced as “absolutely unpatriotic for his withering criticism of Australian aesthetics” (Phillip Adams, Late Night Live). At the time, Boyd argued for a shake up of the way in which Australians think about, teach and consume design. His book became a best seller which opened up new conversations about design.

Listen to this great Late Night Live (LNL) coverage of the 50th anniversary of Boyd’s book (from 2010).  The guests reflect on the cultural impact of Boyd’s work, drilling into Boyd’s argument about Australia’s “aesthetic calamity.” Boyd was moved to write the book because, as he saw it, Australians did not realise how bad our design was at the time (its “atrocious prettiness”).

As the Australian suburban sprawl continues to expand, the podcast guests argue that Boyd’s vivacious writing still resonates. The guests on Late Night Live argue that some critics missed Boyd’s point, which was not derision of suburbia per se. Rather Boyd sought to improve the visual landscape. This includes not just artistic vision, but also making better use of space (“medium density”). Boyd focused on “anti-featurism,” a concept focusing on necessity and “lean” design, rather than excess and superfluous detail. 

The Australian Bureau of Statistics recently reported that Australia’s population is set to double by 2050 to 46 million people. Much of this growth will occur in suburbian Melbourne and Sydney, which will each house 8.5 million people. This population expansion will require architectural ingenuity both in terms of design, maximising space, and sustainability.

(Source: death-by-elocution, via 5ft1)